Shelved Under Murder – Victoria Gilbert

shelved under murder cover

“One thing every librarian learns is that people rarely ask the question they actually want answered.”

Several months have passed since small-town librarian Amy Webber was caught up in the events of A Murder for the Books. Usual warning: if you read on, mention of events in book 2 might spoil some of book 1!

Taylorsford is preparing itself for the annual Heritage Festival, an arts and crafts spectacular. Art becomes the theme for the book, as the discovery of a dead artist seems to tie in with forgery rings and organised crime. Could it be that Amy’s late uncle, himself a struggling artist, might have been more connected to these events than anyone would wish?!

I’ve heard cosy mysteries like this described as ‘palate cleansers’ (or should that be ‘palette’, given the topic? ;)) and this is indeed just that. Light and easy to read, nothing too taxing on the brain, this was a sweet little romance with added murder. Urm…! 😉

I thought the story felt a little more assured than the previous book, or perhaps it was just that less setting up was required. We’re assumed to know who the main cast are, from the first book. Of course, this does mean that new players stand out like sore thumbs, and it was pretty obvious who was going to turn out to be the bad guys. The bigger mystery elements are more reveals about the main characters’ pasts, rather than the more obvious crime of the day.

Still, it served its purpose.  I like that this series is a little less ‘fluffy’ than some cosy mysteries, but it’s still a bit heavy on the romance for my tastes. There’s also the merest hint of something supernatural, which I’m not sure about: I think the author needs to commit to including/explaining some of it, or leave it out. Ymmv, as they say!

NetGalley eARC: ~327 pages / 28 chapters
First published: July 2018
Series: Blue Ridge Library Mysteries book 2
Read from 5th-9th July 2018

My rating: 6/10

Advertisements

84K – Claire North

84k cover

“At the beginning and ending of all things…”

In the future, not too far from now, everything has a price. Crimes are paid for in cold hard cash. Caught shoplifting? Six grand might keep you out of jail. Murder? Well, that depends on the ‘value’ of the life you took. Just don’t commit fraud against the Company – there’s no paying for that.

Theo Miller knows the value of every crime, every life. That’s what he does. Until one day a face from his past disrupts his life of quiet despair. Forced to do what the rest of the country so desperately avoids – to really look at the state of society – Theo is about to make a final entry on his balance sheet.

I have mixed feelings about Claire North’s work. The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August wowed me, for instance, whereas The End of The Day was a bit… hmm. This was unfortunately a bit more towards the latter, for me, with an intriguing ‘what if’ going on but the dystopia was a bit of a downer and the lit-fic style (unfinished sentences, half-thoughts) really started to irk. I got to the end still unsure how some of the switching timelines related, too.

I wouldn’t say ‘don’t read this’ – but, I think I’m not the best audience for it, at least not right now. I felt like I slogged my way through this a little, despite the fact that the writing was, as ever, very good. My biggest interest, however, was trying to figure out the inspiration: perhaps, The Handmaid’s Tale, but with the poor being treated as disposable resource rather than women – as I said, not exactly cheery.

Hardback: 452 pages / 83 chapters
First published: 2018
Series: none
Read from 9th-23rd June 2018

My rating: 6.5/10

I Feel Pretty (2018)

i feel pretty poster

Renee (Amy Schumer) is full of insecurities and wishing she was one of those supermodel-types who walk through life being handed everything on a plate just because they’re skinny and beautiful. She’s a stereotype of ‘normal woman’, in many ways – albeit one who seems a little too disappointed that throwing a coin in a fountain during a thunder storm doesn’t actually make her prettier o_O But when she hits her head in a spin-class accident, she wakes up seeing all of her dreams come true – twist being, it’s all in her head. And yet, the resulting confidence might just be exactly what Renee’s real dreams need to come true…

I went into this expecting either daft fun or a total train wreck – early reviews promised either as a possibility. Thankfully, I found it more of the former and not a repeat of the direness that was Snatched. Critics have argued that it’s poking fun at fat people, but just a second here: Amy Schumer is not fat. She’s not a super-model, sure, but despite the cast of this (or any) movie making it look like 90% of the population belong on magazine covers, she’s pretty normal and it’s the rest of the cast that are making her look anything but.

I actually rather liked the message that confidence is key. And it’s true that the make up and fashion industries are awful for eroding said confidence, setting up unrealistic expectations. Renee’s journey through the movie is predictable, but apart from a bit where confidence grows into shallow arrogance, the character was easy enough to like. I was cheering her on, in fact, as she goes from mouse to strutting her stuff – without one of these cliched glasses-off-makeup-on makeovers. My favourite role, however, was Michelle Williams (Brokeback MountainThe Greatest Showman), affecting a daft voice and having a whale of a time being less than serious for a change.

Overall, this is a feel-good movie with a message I thought was valid and worth telling. I was surprised to find it quite as funny as I did, and even more surprised that it didn’t annoy me – damned with faint praise, but still! 😉

Released: 4th May 2018
Viewed: 11th May 2018
Running time: 110 minutes
Rated: 12A

My rating: 6/10

Fiction Can Be Murder – Becky Clark

fiction can be murder cover

“Melinda Walter settled her lean Pilates body – the maintaining of which took all her free time and could fund North Korea’s military for a year – into the soft leather driver’s seat of her sleek red 1959 classic Corvette.”

When her unpleasant agent is murdered in exactly the same way as Charlee describes in her new book, she’s instantly chief suspect. Given the book hasn’t been published yet, the list of possible murderers is rather worrying restricted to people she knows: her writing group and critique partners, her boyfriend, her agent’s lovely assistant. Driven to clear her own name and reassure herself that her nearest and dearests aren’t cold-blooded killers, Charlee sets out to investigate the case herself.

Of all the ‘cosy mystery’ series I’ve been reading of late, this new one is pretty straight-forward in terms of the main character working her way through a fixed list of suspects. I was a little irritated by the large number of weird names, from Charlemagne to Einstein to Queue (what?!), wishing we could have just had one weird moniker and a bunch of Pauls and Susans, quite frankly – but hey, small irritations!

Everyone seems to have their own quirks and secrets, too, making it quite a motley cast – but, no problems remembering who everyone is, I suppose.

Overall, it was a nice easy read and I did appreciate that. The mystery was a bit ‘hmm’, especially as a few background things were thrown in as the story progressed, tying things together but feeling just a bit forced.

I’d give the series another go, yes, but so far it’s not my favourite of the recent crop.

NetGalley eARC: 288 pages / 29 chapters
First published: 2018
Series: A Mystery Writer’s Mystery book 1
Read from 3rd-7th April 2018

My rating: 6/10

The Cat of the Baskervilles – Vicki Delany

cat of the baskervilles cover

“The footsteps of a gigantic hound!”

I’m still enjoying my occasional dips into cosy mysteries set in bookshops or libraries, and it was nice to be able to nab a copy of the third installment of this series, from NetGalley. We first met Gemma Doyle – no relation to author Sir Arthur however much her own uncle Arthur would like to claim – in Elementary, She Read and then Body on Baker Street. Londoner Gemma has moved to the picturesque seaside town of Cape Cod, North America, following the break up of her marriage. She now runs a Sherlock Holmes-themed bookstore, with her best friend Jayne managing the coffee shop next door. She’s got a tangled past with the local police force, as her powers of deduction rival those of the great detective himself – unfortunately making it look like she might have just a little too much information about various crimes.

In this third installment, Gemma’s determined not to get involved in yet another mystery – but of course, it wouldn’t be much of a story unless she does! So when a once-famous actor arrives to play Holmes in an amateur production of Hound of the Baskervilles, the in-fighting of the theatre crowd stirs up something quite deadly…

This was a very quick and easy read, and enjoyable enough, but perhaps not quite as good as the first two in the series. I did think for a little while that the plot from the previous book was being recycled, but things are changed up ‘enough’. I wasn’t entirely sure I was okay with Gemma’s meddling being borderline criminal, right enough! There is a bit of progress on the personal lives side of the stories, but this is kept to background material rather than overwhelming the main plot and mystery.

Book four is due out in the autumn, and I think I’m glad about that – while at the same time hoping the author isn’t rushing too many of these out at the expense of quality.

NetGalley eARC: 304 pages / 16 chapters
First published: 2018
Series: A Sherlock Holmes Bookshop Mystery book 3
Read from 11th-14th February 2018

My rating: 6/10

The Death Cure (2018)

death cure poster

The story that began with The Maze Runner (2014) reaches its conclusion with the delayed (after an on-set accident) final part of the trilogy. Can Thomas finally escape from WCKD’s attentions? Can a cure for the deadly Flare virus be found before the whole world is turned into zombies? Can I remember much of anything about the previous movies, or in fact the books they are based on?

To be honest, I went to see this for lack of better options, and an excuse to try out the new 4DX screen at my local cinema – that’s the one where the seats throw you about, air puffs at your ears every time a bullet is shot, and the occasional weird scent is wafted at you. Hmm. Okay, it did add a certain something to the whole experience, but striping away that novelty, the film underneath was just a bit… so-so.

I was desperately unimpressed with the middle installment of the trilogy, The Scorch Trials (2015), so there was no way I was going to rewatch it for the plot reminder – although I possibly could have done with it. Still, there’s not vast amounts that you can’t pick up – Brenda must have been bitten at some point, for instance, and Minho captured. Thus we begin with a reasonably action-packed rescue scene. Get used to it: the original movie was about escape, the second all about running away from various things, and now we have the rescuing everyone repeatedly.

It’s not a bad movie. It’s not great, either, although it is an improvement on the previous film. The acting is reasonable, it’s been made well enough and has some interesting and effective visuals. Ultimately, though, I think the story underneath just isn’t as strong as it thinks it is.

Released: 26th January 2018
Viewed: 27th January 2018
Running time: 142 minutes
Rated: 12A

My rating: 6/10

The Plot is Murder – VM Burns

the plot is murder cover

“‘Victor Carlston, don’t you think it’s wicked to sit here enjoying yourself while your dearest relative lies at death’s door?'”

I like to change pace with my reading, and so after the rather dark The Chalk Man it was time for sometime a bit more fluffy – step forward first in a new cosy mystery series, set in a bookshop, of course 🙂

Samantha Washington is a young(ish) widow, and uses the insurance money plus sale of her now too-big home to fund the dream she and her beloved husband shared: opening a mystery book store. She’s giving up teaching to run the store and also pursue her own dream of writing a mystery book – the bulk of which we get to read interspersed through the ‘real’ mystery, which begins when Sam’s much-loathed realtor is found dead in her new back yard.

I guessed the ‘twist’ very early on, but this is still a charming enough read. I did like the supporting cast of octogenarians, Sam’s grandmother and her friends, who are a spritely lot largely responsible for the sleuthing that takes place. It’s nice to see older characters in general, really, although they are balanced with a few teenagers, too.

In terms of the writing style, this was very easy to read. I was a bit irritated by the running gag of the sweary-grandmother constantly having coughing fits, and also thought that the MC’s two dogs are given distracting lines of focus when totally unnecessary. Minor things overall, though.

The book-within-the-book device is a nice touch, but to be honest the writing of these parts isn’t particularly strong – probably as it’s ‘supposed’ to be, in terms of the story, but I did find the American-writing-British-toffs a little… hmm.

Overall, this served its purpose and I was genuinely looking forward to curling up with it over a few evenings. That’s a pretty good recommendation for ‘fluff’ 😉

NetGalley eARC: 256 pages / 25 chapters
First published: 2016
Series: Mystery Bookshop book 1
Read from 9th-10th January 2018

My rating: 6/10